Friday, March 29, 2013

What Should We Cut USA?


Check out the video, 

Clear picture of why the USA will never balance the budget.  

The Sheeple want cuts in the budget.. 
but they cant think of a department? Go Figure.

Why not the Defense Budget, 

"Bill Maher stated We spend more on defense than the next 17 nations combined. Our Navy is bigger than the next 11 Navies combined. Do we need this much?"

And Almost all of them Are Allies In Defense!


Monday, March 25, 2013

Lessons of Cyprus

The deal hammered out for Cyprus last night isn't "fair". Angry Cypriots are right about that. In important respects, Cyprus has not received the same treatment as other bailed-out eurozone economies.


That is partly because Cyprus and its banks are an extreme case, but it is also a matter of timing. The brutal truth is that the Cypriots held out too long.
Rightly or wrongly, European officials and the IMF think markets are confident enough now to take a lesson in "creditor responsibility". If Cyprus had gone for help when investors still thought the single currency was about to explode, it would have had a stronger hand.
Robert Peston is right to point out the disastrous consequences of the bailout for the Cyprus economy. Depositors with more than 100,000 euros ($130,000; £85,000) in the bank are going to lose billions.
The fact that the exact penalty won't be known for some time, with many accounts frozen entirely while that is decided, only makes things worse. It is hard to see how anybody is going to get any credit in this country in the foreseeable future, and an economy without credit is an economy that cannot do very much at all.


As I said on the Today programme this morning, the short-term implications for the rest of eurozone are clearly much less serious. Cyprus only accounts for less than one quarter of 1% of eurozone GDP.
Some will obviously be concerned about financial contagion - the risk that depositors and investors in Italy or Spain will look at this deal and wonder if they could also lose out if their bank got into trouble.
The officials who negotiated this deal are pretty sure that the hit to depositor confidence will be less than if the Cypriot government had been able to go ahead with last week's plan and raid the accounts of even small-scale depositors. After a week of foolish wobbling, the eurozone has decided that deposits worth up to 100,000 euros are sacred after all.

However, I'm not sure we're quite back to where we were a few weeks ago. The nasty way that this crisis has been resolved - and the message that has now been sent to private creditors - may well have lasting implications, even if the agonies of the Cyprus economy do not.

To obtain help from its fellow eurozone members, a country has been forced - at financial gunpoint - to destroy the part of its economy that has accounted for most of its growth for more than a generation. It has been told that this has to happen, without even a vote in parliament.
The Irish got a taste of this when they were put under pressure in their bailout negotiations to raise their low rate of corporation tax. Dublin was able to resist. As I said at the start, Cyprus had given itself a weaker hand.

The lesson for governments and ordinary voters is that finance ministers are going to do their best to hold this eurozone together, but it is not going to be pretty - economically, or politically.
The lesson to private creditors from Germany, the IMF and others at the negotiating table last night was that things were getting back to normal, and that normality cannot just mean that stock markets and bond prices continue to go up.

We have had nearly five years when governments were nervous of suggesting that anybody could lose anything they lent to a bank, either as a depositor or an investor. For creditors and depositors with more than 100,000 euros in their account, the message is that this is no longer true.
Officials think the markets are strong enough to take this lesson in creditor responsibility. We'll find out soon enough if they're right.


Sunday, March 10, 2013

Wrongful Imprisonment Inmate awarded $13.2 million




CINCINNATI -- An Ohio man who was exonerated after spending 13 years in prison for murder cried as a federal jury found that two Cleveland police detectives violated his civil rights by coercing and falsifying testimony and withholding evidence that pointed to his innocence.
The jury's verdict on Friday, which included awarding $13.2 million to David Ayers of Cleveland for his pain and suffering, brings an end to the legal battle he's been fighting since his arrest in the 1999 killing of 76-year-old Dorothy Brown.

Nobel Prize-winning economist and New York Times columnist told Sen. Ron Johnson (R-WI) that he had all the wrong facts on Social Security.




During a heated Roundtable discussion on “This Week with George Stephanopoulos,”the Nobel Prize-winning economist and New York Times columnist told Sen. Ron Johnson (R-WI) that he had all the wrong facts on Social Security.
“Your facts are false,” Krugman told Johnson, adding, “It's important to realize that the facts that are being brought out here are in fact, non-facts.”
Paul Krugman accused a Republican Senator of trying to have a debate with all the wrong facts.
During a heated Roundtable discussion on “This Week with George Stephanopoulos,”the Nobel Prize-winning economist and New York Times columnist told Sen. Ron Johnson (R-WI) that he had all the wrong facts on Social Security.
“Your facts are false,” Krugman told Johnson, adding, “It's important to realize that the facts that are being brought out here are in fact, non-facts.”
Krugman was taking issue with Johnson’s claim that the fiscal health of the Social Security program is in danger because its trust fund doesn’t really exist. Krugman argued on “This Week” that Johnson was “changing the rules midstream” by denying that Social Security has a dedicated revenue base.
Krugman has criticized Social Security detractors for making similar claims in the past. The program is funded both by the federal budget and by a law that gives it a dedicated source of revenue, according to Krugman. That means that even when the money going into the program may be less than the money it's paying out, its fiscal health isn’t at risk because the program still has the money it needs to run.
Still, that doesn’t mean the Social Security program can run in its current form forever. The trust fund is scheduled to run out by 2033. Lawmakers on both sides of the aisle have said they would be willing to make changes to Social Security do deal with the country’s deficit problems. But they’re far off from an agreement; Republicans say they won’t raise taxes to fix the program, while Democrats don’t want to cut benefits.





Thursday, March 7, 2013

North Korea Threatens to Attack U.S. With ‘Lighter and Smaller Nukes’


Ignoring threats of retaliation, the United Nations Security Council ordered new economic sanctions against North Korea on Thursday for its third nuclear test last month, unanimously approving a resolution that the United States negotiated with China, the North’s greatest protector.

In an angry response, North Korea said Friday that it was nullifying all agreements of nonaggression and denuclearization with South Koreaand was cutting off the North-South hot line. But beyond those steps, it was unclear how, if at all, North Korea’s young and untested leader, Kim Jong-un, would react to the rebuke. 

Source

Tuesday, March 5, 2013

North Korean Threatens South Korea And The World


"We aim to launch surgical strikes at any time and any target without being bounded by the armistice accord and advance our long-cherished wish for national unification," the statement said. North Korea lays the blame for its much-condemned nuclear weapons programs on the United States.

North Korea Threatens To End Ceasefire With South Over Military Drills, Sanctions


SEOUL, South Korea -- North Korea vowed Tuesday to cancel the 1953 cease-fire that ended the Korean War, citing a U.S.-led push for punishing U.N. sanctions over its recent nuclear test and ongoing U.S.-South Korean joint military drills.
Without elaborating, the Korean People's Army Supreme Command warned of "surgical strikes" meant to unify the divided Korean Peninsula and of an indigenous, "precision nuclear striking tool." The statement came amid reports that Washington and North Korean ally Beijing have approved a draft of a U.N. Security Council resolution calling for sanctions in response to North Korea's Feb. 12 nuclear test. The draft is expected to be circulated at the U.N. this week.
Such heated military rhetoric and threats are common from North Korea as tensions rise on the Korean Peninsula, and Pyongyang's recent nuclear test and rocket launches, and the push for U.N. punishment that have followed, have increased already high animosity between the North and Washington and ally Seoul.
The United States and others worry that North Korea's third nuclear test pushes it a step closer toward its goal of having nuclear-armed missiles that can reach America, and condemn its nuclear and missile efforts as threats to regional security and a drain on the resources that could go to North Korea's largely destitute people.
North Korea says its nuclear program is a response to U.S. hostility that dates back to the 1950-53 Korean War, which ended with an armistice, not a peace treaty, leaving the Korean Peninsula still technically in a state of war.
North Korea warned it will cancel the armistice agreement on March 11 because of ongoing U.S.-South Korean military drills that began March 1 which the statement called a "dangerous nuclear war targeted at us."
North Korea said Washington and others are going beyond mere economic sanctions and expanding into blunt aggression and military acts. North Korea also warned that it will block a communications line between it and the United States at the border village separating the two Koreas.
"We aim to launch surgical strikes at any time and any target without being bounded by the armistice accord and advance our long-cherished wish for national unification," the statement said.
North Korea lays the blame for its much-condemned nuclear weapons programs on the United States.

Monday, March 4, 2013

China Giant Real Estate Bubble...



This 60 Minutes is amazing...HUGE Cities in China, without any residents, they create 22-24 cities per year, and NO ONE LIVES IN THEM! You gotta see this 60 minutes segment to believe it.


How did Zhang Xin go from working in a sweatshop to being a billionaire real estate developer? Lesley Stahl reports.








Yes! fascinating story about Xin, her husband, and the most fabulous architecture. Amazing and inspiring. Mentioned but not so interesting or important? The impending crash of the Chinese economy, the conniving double-cross of the middle class, the huge cheap impoverished labor force. A spin-chilling similarity to the building of the pyramids - slave labor to build monuments and wealth for the elite. Perhaps like Xin, the poor will be sleeping on desks in those offices rather than living in homes. When the global economy finally crashes and there is no bail out or middle class to steal from - thank you smart, driven, clever rich corporate elite - we'll tune into 60 Minutes and see what clues there are to what will happen next!by maxmate March 4, 2013 7:19 PM EST


Archeologists Unearth Alien-Like Skulls In A Mexico Cemetery




Archeologists have unearthed what looks like a cone-shaped alien skull from 1,000 years ago in Mexico.
The skull, which dates from 945 A.D. to 1308 A.D., was discovered accidentally while digging an irrigation system in the northwest state of Sonora in Mexico.
Cristina Garcia Moreno, who worked on the project with Arizona State University, explained that 13 of the 25 skulls found in the Hispanic cemetery had these deformed heads.
“We don’t know why this population specifically deformed their heads,” Moreno told ABC News.
The site, known as El Cementerio, was discovered in 1999, but the team just completed their analysis of the skeletal remains last month. They plan to continue their research during the next field season. Archaeologists also discovered artifacts on the site, like pendants, nose rings and jewelry.
They said the deformation of human skulls was part of an ancient ritual that took place 1,000 years ago. The deformation was achieved by binding a person’s head between two blocks of wood to apply pressure on the skull by wrapping the wood with bands.
“Cranial deformation has been used by different societies in the world as a ritual practice, or for distinction of status within a group or to distinguish between social groups,” Moreno told ABC News. “The reason why these individuals at El Cementerio deformed their skulls is still unknown.”
The team said that many of the bones unearthed were the remains of children, leading them to believe the practice of deforming skulls “may have been inlet and dangerous.”
The Chinook of the U.S. Northwest and the Choctaw of the U.S. Southeast both were known for practicing skull deformation as well.
Moreno told ABC that people deformed their heads in Mexico because they wanted to distinguish important people, or they wanted to distinguish people from one group from another.
http://www.redorbit.com/news/science/1112754510/alien-like-skulls-unearthed-mexico-122712/

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